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October 29, 2021

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How to Install Wine on openSUSE Tumbleweed

Contents

Install Wine from the openSUSE repository

The best option for most Wine installations

Install Wine from an RPM file

A reusable RPM installation file and choice of x86_64 (64-bit) or i586 (32-bit) Wine

Install Wine from the openSUSE repository

These instructions explain how to install a recent version of Wine Development or Wine Staging. Wine Stable is not available.

Winetricks will be installed along with Wine.

During testing, refreshing repositories with zypper refresh generated an error due to not finding the installation disk/iso. Opening the Software app (YAST Software), locating the list of repositories (under Configuration), and disabling the installation medium repository ("openSUSE-20210810-0", in my case) fixed the problem.

Do a full system upgrade

Open a Terminal window and execute

> sudo zypper refresh
> sudo zypper dist-upgrade
> sudo reboot

Add repository

The following command (a single line with no line breaks) adds the openSUSE Tumbleweed Wine repository.

> sudo zypper addrepo https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/Emulators:Wine/openSUSE_Tumbleweed/Emulators:Wine.repo

Update the package database

When zypper refresh asks you to trust it, you can respond with either t or a.

> sudo zypper refresh

Install wine

The next command will install Wine Development. If you prefer Wine Staging, replace wine with wine-staging.

> sudo zypper install wine
 

Verify the installation.

> wine --version

Configure Wine

The default Wine configuration prepares Wine as a Windows 7 environment, which is good for some older Windows apps, but many contemporary apps will be better matched to Windows 8.1 or Windows 10. In addition, other configuration options may be significant.

To bring up Wine's configuration panel, open a Terminal window and execute winecfg. When prompted, set your preferred version of Windows and accept all offers to install Mono and Gecko.

Depending on the version of Wine, Gecko may need to be installed twice (for 32-bit and for 64-bit) or not at all. (Wine 6.0.1 will install Gecko twice. Wine 6.17 and later will not ask to install Gecko, but a Windows app that needs Gecko will, during installation, prompt to be allowed to install it.)

$ wine winecfg

If you are creating custom Wine prefixes, this configuration must be repeated for each prefix.

A couple simple tests

Just for fun, or to see Wine in action …

Display a simple clock.

$ wine clock

Run Wine's builtin web browser.

$ wine iexplore

Install Wine from an RPM file

In addition to getting a reusable RPM Wine installation file, you can choose either x86-64 Wine (64/32-bit Wine, the same as the repository installation) or i586 Wine (32-bit Wine that can be installed on either i586 hardware or x86-64 hardware.

Do a full system upgrade

Open a Terminal window and execute

> sudo zypper refresh
> sudo zypper dist-upgrade
> sudo reboot

Download the Wine or Wine Staging installation file

Add the openSUSE Tumbleweed Wine repository

Adding this repository provides the openSUSE Tumbleweed keys needed to validate installing packages from the downloads. If you do not want to add the repository, you can proceed without it, but you will need to explicitly authorize installing unvalidated packages.

The following command (a single line with no line breaks) adds the openSUSE Tumbleweed Wine repository.

> sudo zypper addrepo https://download.opensuse.org/repositories/Emulators:Wine/openSUSE_Tumbleweed/Emulators:Wine.repo

Update the package database

When zypper refresh asks you to trust the Wine (openSUSE_Tumbleweed) repository, you can respond with either t or a.

> sudo zypper refresh

Install Wine

Change directories to your download location (maybe ~/Downloads).

> cd ~/Downloads

Install Wine or Wine Staging from the installation RPM file previously downloaded.

> sudo zypper install name-of-rpm-file

Verify the installation.

> wine --version

Configure Wine

The default Wine configuration prepares Wine as a Windows 7 environment, which is good for some older Windows apps, but many contemporary apps will be better matched to Windows 8.1 or Windows 10. In addition, other configuration options may be significant.

To bring up Wine's configuration panel, open a Terminal window and execute winecfg. When prompted, set your preferred version of Windows and accept all offers to install Mono and Gecko.

Depending on the version of Wine, Gecko may need to be installed twice (for 32-bit and for 64-bit) or not at all. (Wine 6.0.1 will install Gecko twice. Wine 6.17 and later will not ask to install Gecko, but a Windows app that needs Gecko will, during installation, prompt to be allowed to install it.)

$ wine winecfg

If you are creating custom Wine prefixes, this configuration must be repeated for each prefix.

A couple simple tests

Just for fun, or to see Wine in action …

Display a simple clock.

$ wine clock

Run Wine's builtin web browser.

$ wine iexplore


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